?

Log in

default

September 2015

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930   
Powered by LiveJournal.com
default

Is that a Twisted Sister pin (next to the flag pin) on your uniform?

So there are a few things that I hear people say frequently when it comes to elections. I've translated what these phrases actually sound like to me when my brain interprets the words:

Statement: "I like what s/he is proposing but it will never happen"
Translation: "There is a better way, but I've given up hope."

Statement: "Only the candidates who raise the most money can possibly win."
Translation: "Corporations and special interests run our country and there's nothing I can do about it."

Statement: "A candidate who isn't near the center cannot be elected."
Translation: "As a country we've decided to elect those without principles; those who will say whatever it takes, usually vague, false, and meaningless rhetoric."

Statement: "I'd vote for her/him, but I don't think they can win."
Translation: "Our system does not work in a way that represents me as a citizen."

Statement: "I never vote because it doesn't really matter what I think or how I vote."
Translation: "I never vote because it doesn't really matter what I think or how I vote."
(Ok, so this last one didn't really need translation...)

These statements are not just frequent, they are so common that I'd be willing to bet that almost every person reading this has said or thought one or more of them, and probably recently. The recurring themes are no hope for change, no hope for better government, no hope for the future in this country.

So what are we going to do about it?

Are we going to keep voting for the same homogenized caricatures over and over again? Keep allowing ourselves to *not* be represented? Keep feeling powerless? Keep bickering partisan politics which only serves to divide us and maintain the status quo?

Screw that noise.

Listen to the candidates who are actually saying something; don't just swallow the rhetoric of your chosen party or a particular candidate; think it through and see if what they are saying truly makes sense or if they are simply full of balloon juice. Show up to events to support them. Talk to others respectfully about the candidates and the issues. (Also try be sure to listen as much or more than you talk! It's impossible to learn anything when your mouth is running. ;)

Then vote your conscience.

Vote for the candidate that best represents not just your immediate interests, but for the best interests of the country and the world as a whole. We are all in this together and more interdependent than ever before. What most benefits us globally will best benefit us as individuals.

Ok. Enough of this soapbox. I need more coffee. This video is a little on the nose, but I just couldn't help myself. I hope it's prophetic...

Comments

I love that you are back on here.

and totally standing ovation for what you said.
Thanks! I hope I'm back again. Just sick of FB and the superficiality of it all. I missed writing things with some substance, and LJ gives me a good space to do that. I just wish 99% of my friends hadn't left LJ. :/

Oh, I get to see you soon. For real! :D
The problem is often that a candidate for office may have a position on one issue that I can embrace, while having a position on another issue that I disagree with. It's especially a problem for someone who is fiscally conservative and socially liberal. Those kinds of candidates seem to be a dying breed. Usually I have to decide what the most important issue to me is and pick the candidate who nearest approximates my views on it.
Well sure. I mean if there isn't something I disagree with about a candidate it's probably because they simply haven't come out and really said what they believe. But so few of them have any real beliefs or principles because that renders them "unelectable."

Not agreeing with an entire platform is just how it goes. Like you I lean toward the fiscally conservative and socially liberal which, as you point out, is a tough combo to find in a politician these days. I think Sanders might fall into that category (certainly he is socially liberal, and so far he has followed up those policies with how he plans to pay for them) but time will tell as we get closer.

I don't think I've ever let a single issue make my decision for me, though some certainly carry more weight than others.